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Danny has a varied career as a film writer, sound designer and composer; a university lecturer, and an author of cultural and philosophical books.

His publications contribute to the study of phenomenology and aesthetics, including his pioneering work on cinematic primitivism. His fiction works explore themes such as sexuality, solitude, and monomania in a variety of genres.

Danny studied film and trained as a classical violinist and composer. He is a Berlinale Talent, with three feature films in his growing portfolio of work.

Email: info@dannyhahn.com

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Video Trailer for Primeval Cinema - An Audiovisual Philosophy

Video Trailer for Primeval Cinema - An Audiovisual Philosophy The images within this trailer are all from films discussed in the book Primeval Cinema - An Audiovisual Philosophy. They are films concerned with stillness, sparseness, quietness and silence. Some of the films featured in the book and this trailer are: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick 1968), L’Age d’Or (Luis Buñuel 1930), Altered [more]

The Silent Sound Designer - An Introduction to Quietness

The Silent Sound Designer - An Introduction to Quietness Extracts and discussions from: Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy (ISBN – 9780993338618). Quietness and the Faculty of Thought Reducing levels of sound has often been necessary in creating a comfortable environment for work, since noise can be invasive to our thoughts. Schopenhauer even goes as far as to describe the level of [more]

Trailer and Posters for 'Two Tales of Sexuality and Solitude'

Trailer and Posters for 'Two Tales of Sexuality and Solitude' Two Tales of Sexuality and Solitude Written for the Screen 'Tenderly' and 'Second Sleep' are an erotic-drama duet for the screen; a pair of psychological, romantic-thriller nocturnes exploring jealousy, sexuality, and solitude. Danny Hahn's screenplays are simple, yet challenging, with a melancholy insight into the human condition. His keen sense for drama, dialogue, [more]

Stravinsky and the Birth of Aesthetic Primitivism

Stravinsky and the Birth of Aesthetic PrimitivismOn the Edge of Audio-Vision Extracts and discussions from: Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy  In the third section of the book Primeval Cinema (Peripheral Audio-Vision - When Sound Looks into the Lens), we are concerned with perhaps the most sophisticated uses of primitivism in primeval cinema. They are audio-visual elements perceived [more]

Yasujirō Ozu and the Search for Cinematic Purity

Yasujirō Ozu and the Search for Cinematic PurityExtracts and discussions from: Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy  A test to discover the simplicity of valuing or appreciating greatness, is found in the failure to recreate a masterpiece. Yasujirō Ozu, Robert Bresson and Carl Th. Dreyer are perhaps among the greatest of primeval cinema directors – by which I [more]

Dylan Thomas and Poetry in 'Primeval Cinema'

Dylan Thomas and Poetry in 'Primeval Cinema'Extracts and discussions from: Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy  Dylan Thomas and his poetry has influenced my writing, and his Under Milk Wood features in Primeval Cinema as a general tone setting. As part of my research, I took a trip to Wales. Up the steep hill towards Dylan Thomas's boathouse [more]

Refutable Magnificence vs. Irrefutable Rubbish: The Fallacy of Criticism

Refutable Magnificence vs. Irrefutable Rubbish: The Fallacy of CriticismOn Theory and Criticism Extracts and discussions from: Primeval Cinema - An Audiovisual Philosophy    It is easy, all too recklessly easy to criticise film theory’s tendency to inundate the reader with categories and sub-categories (albeit justifiably so, since they could ultimately be refuted or even sub-categorised upon ad infinitum). Michel Chion, to [more]

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Primeval Cinema

An Audiovisual Philosophy

Cinema’s existence is young, but perhaps the meaning of cinema is…primeval. The camera or microphone may be a new tool, but what we use them for is older than we may think. Emptiness, simplicity, stillness and silence in film are discussed in this book as a presence rather than an absence. Sounds give structure and meaning to silence; dialogue accentuates pauses; movements revalue stasis; information shapes the unknown. This passionate proposal for resurrecting a style of aesthetic cinematic primitivism attempts to capture the subtlest moments in film. Primeval Cinema has the power to inspire in us images beyond the screen.  Danny Hahn’s unique, poetic and reflective book is fuelled by his enthusiasm for silent cinema, philosophy, and the films of Ozu, Bresson, Dreyer, Tati, and Tarkovsky.

ISBN – 9780993338618   Price – £8.99   Copyright – Danny Hahn   Edition – First Edition   Publisher – Zarathustra Books   Published – 25 Jan 2016   Language – English   Pages – 128   Binding – Perfect-bound Paperback

– watch the trailer here – 

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Two Tales of Sexuality and Solitude

Written for the Screen

‘Tenderly’ and ‘Second Sleep’ are an erotic-drama duet for the screen; a pair of psychological, romantic-thriller nocturnes exploring jealousy, sexuality, and solitude. Danny Hahn’s screenplays are simple, yet challenging, with a melancholy insight into the human condition. His keen sense for drama, dialogue, and the language of audiovisual art reveals a world of nightmares in love and life.

ISBN – 9780993338625   Price – £6.99   Copyright – Danny Hahn   Edition – First Edition   Publisher – Zarathustra Books   Published – 2nd Feb 2016   Language – English   Pages – 128   Binding – Perfect-bound Paperback

– watch the trailer here –

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  4 Responses to “”

  1. Werner Herzog once remarked: “If you truly love film, I think the healthiest thing to do is not read books on the subject”. That has been my philosophy for most of my life, until I read Danny Hahn’s Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy. The reason why this book stands out from most other ‘film theory’ literature is because it seems to deny anything which resembles traditional theory on cinema. Hahn even humourously remarks himself: “to call the ‘primeval filmmaker’ a theorist or technician is as absurd as calling a pornographer a gynaecologist – working with the same specialty doesn’t mean the same profession.” But most strikingly, it is a book about filmmaking, (in particular, audio-vision/film sound), which doesn’t dwell too heavily on cinematic theories and schools of thought, but instead, it talks about what it’s like to be a spectator and a creator. It is really more of a philosophy book than a cinema book, because Hahn uses Phenomenology to describe the experiencing film participant through the use of their senses.
    Written like a poem or a soliloquy, this is probably the only book I have read which goes into so much depth about ‘absence’ and all the things which go unnoticed in film. It is surprisingly beautiful to experience as a reader.

  2. Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy.
    After a lot of philosophical head-scratching, I started to get a headache, because I wasn’t prepared for what I thought would be a book about practical filmmaking. Instead, it was more about what goes on inside your head rather than what goes on the screen. But later on in the book, there were actually some really good tips on filmmaking that I will never forget. I never thought of sound being ‘framed’ like a photo, and I never thought of how important silence in film was. After I reread the book, it started to make more sense to me, and I think its probably one of the better books on film that I have read for a while.

  3. Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy.
    A very strange book, but that’s why I liked it! When the words ‘audiovision’ and ‘audiovisual’ popped up from time to time, I thought Danny Hahn would have been influenced by the great Michel Chion (who wrote Audio-Vision). But instead of cinema and audiovisual art progressing from where film theory had last left off, he preferred to mention pre-cinema thinking philosophers such as Schopenhauer and Nietzsche.
    The title of the book is slightly deceiving, because it makes you feel like you’re going to learn about how to make movies with your bare hands and primitive tools. What the book actually does, is teach you how to see cultural, artistic developments before cinema even began – almost like he wants to start cinema all over again from scratch! It’s strange, because you actually feel like you’ve learned everything you need to know about cinema, but when you look back at the pages, there’s not much about cinema at all!
    I really liked it, but I’m not sure whether it’s for everybody.

  4. Primeval Cinema – An Audiovisual Philosophy.
    A brilliant book! Highly recommended. Filmmakers like Ozu, Tarkovsky, Hitchcock, Asquith, Bergman, Bresson, Kubrick, Dreyer, Herzog, Eisenstein and Tati all end up in this book like an ‘art-house-mix-tape’ for cinephiles. In the preface, we are taken on a journey to 19th century Vienna where creative geniuses hang out in coffee bars, and later on, you feel like you’re sitting in that very café beside Stefan Zweig and Hugo von Hofmannsthal, mixed in with 20th century filmmakers – like a cultural time warp. The conclusion of the book is a series of aphorisms which sound so fresh and original, that it should be quoted by scholars and filmmakers for many years to come.

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